……..it can mess with your sense of balance.

But it can also mess with your sense of balance.

Thomson Reuters

It may throw off your balance, as it influences activity in the cerebellum and basal ganglia, two brain areas that help regulate balance, coordination, reaction time, and posture.

And it can distort your sense of time.

Feeling as if time is sped up or slowed down is one of the most commonly reported effects of using marijuana. A 2012 paper sought to draw some more solid conclusions from some of the studies on those anecdotal reports, but it was unable to do so.

“Even though 70% of time estimation studies report overestimation, the findings of time production and time reproduction studies remain inconclusive,” the paper said.

In a 1998 study that used magnetic resonance imaging to focus on the brains of volunteers on THC, the authors noted that many had altered blood flow to the cerebellum, which most likely plays a role in our sense of time.

Limitations on what sort of marijuana research is allowed make it particularly difficult to study this sort of effect.

Weed can also turn your eyes red.

Since weed makes blood vessels expand, it can give you red eyes.

And you’ll probably get the munchies.

And you'll probably get the munchies.

Mmm, pizza.Jun/Flickr

A case of the munchies is no figment of the imagination — both casual and heavy marijuana users tend to overeat when they smoke.

Marijuana may effectively flip a circuit in the brain that is normally responsible for quelling the appetite, triggering us to eat instead, according to a recent study of mice.

It all comes down to a special group of cells in the brain that are normally activated after we have eaten a big meal to tell us we’ve had enough. The psychoactive ingredient in weed appears to activate just one component of those appetite-suppressing cells, making us feel hungry rather than satisfied.

Marijuana may also interfere with how you form memories.

Marijuana can mess with your memory by changing the way your brain processes information, but scientists still aren’t sure exactly how this happens. Still, several studies suggest that weed interferes with short-term memory, and researchers tend to see more of these effects in inexperienced or infrequent users than in heavy, frequent users.

Unsurprisingly, these effects are most evident in the acute sense — immediately after use, when people are high.

According to the new NASEM report, there was limited evidence showing a connection between cannabis use and impaired academic achievement, something that has been shown to be especially true for people who begin smoking regularly during adolescence. (That has also been shown to increase the risk for problematic use.)

Importantly, in most cases, saying cannabis is connected to an increased risk doesn’t mean marijuana use caused that risk.

And in some people, weed could increase the risk of depression …

And in some people, weed could increase the risk of depression ...

Thomson Reuters

Scientists can’t say for sure whether marijuana causes depression or depressed people are simply more likely to smoke. But one study from the Netherlands suggests that smoking weed could raise the risk of depression for young people who already have a special serotonin gene that could make them more vulnerable to depression.

Those findings are bolstered by the NASEM report, which found moderate evidence that cannabis use was linked to a small increased risk of depression.

… and it may also increase the risk of developing schizophrenia.

... and it may also increase the risk of developing schizophrenia.

Matilde Campodonico/AP

The NASEM report also found substantial evidence of an increased risk among frequent marijuana users of developing schizophrenia — something that studies have shown is a particular concern for people at risk for schizophrenia in the first place.

Regular marijuana use may also be connected to an increased risk of social anxiety.

Regular marijuana use may also be connected to an increased risk of social anxiety.

REUTERS/Jason Redmond

Researchers think it’s possible that CBD might be a useful treatment for anxiety disorders, and that’s something that several institutions are currently trying to study.

And in general, the recent report thought the evidence that marijuana increased the risk of most anxiety disorders was limited.

However, the authors write that there is moderate evidence that regular marijuana use is connected to an increased risk of social anxiety. As in other cases, it’s hard to know whether marijuana use causes that increase or people use marijuana because of an increased risk of social anxiety.

Most importantly, regular weed use is linked with some specific brain changes — but scientists can’t say for sure whether one causes the other.

Most importantly, regular weed use is linked with some specific brain changes — but scientists can't say for sure whether one causes the other.

Jason Redmond/Reuters

In a recent study, scientists used a combination of MRI brain scans to get a better picture of the brains of adults who have smoked weed at least four times a week for years.

Compared with people who rarely or never used, the long-term users tended to have a smaller orbitofrontal cortex, a brain region critical for processing emotions and making decisions. But they also had stronger cross-brain connections, which scientists think smokers may develop to compensate.

Still, the study doesn’t show that smoking pot caused certain regions of the brain to shrink; other studies suggest that having a smaller orbitofrontal cortex in the first place could make someone more likely to start smoking.

Most researchers agree that the people most susceptible to brain changes are those who begin using marijuana regularly during adolescence.

Marijuana use affects the lungs but doesn’t seem to increase the risk of lung cancer.

Marijuana use affects the lungs but doesn't seem to increase the risk of lung cancer.

Silvia Izquierdo/A

People who smoke marijuana regularly are more likely to experience chronic bronchitis, according to the report. There’s also evidence that stopping smoking relieves these symptoms.

Yet perhaps surprisingly, the report’s authors found moderate evidence that cannabis was not connected to any increased risk of the lung cancers or head and neck cancers associated with smoking.

 

Racoo Screening has 16 years’ experience in assisting companies and other organisations with the development and management of their drug and alcohol programme, including their drug and alcohol misuse policy

Whether you are a small business, large international corporate or public sector organisation, Racoo Screening can help with your individual requirements offering a professional, personal and flexible implementation and advice service.

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